By | September 7, 2019

ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA – Over the next few weeks,Brother Wolf’s chapter projects in McDowell, Rutherford, and Dickenson counties will all become independent non-profit organizations.

Brother Wolf originally began these auxiliary chapters with the intention of reducing the counties’ kill rates and ultimately developing each chapter into a self-sustaining, separate entity. After several years of growth, the chapters are ready to bring this goal to fruition.

The McDowell County North Carolina chapter is the first to stand on its own now operates under the name Day One Animal Rescue as of mid-August. The McDowell Chapter was founded in 2016 to address the county’s need for better animal support; historically, McDowell County had one of the highest kill rates of Western North Carolina. Thanks to the development of a passionate network of animal lovers, this chapter was able to rescue more than 400 animals in
2018.

Contributed photograph

The Rutherford County chapter will soon be known as Heart of the Foothills Animal Rescue. This chapter was founded in 2016 to extend the reach of Brother Wolf’s mission to build and sustain No-Kill communities. In 2018, the Rutherford chapter installed kennels to transform the space into an adoption center, which has allowed the chapter to house and save the lives of more
animals. The installation has also enabled the chapter’s transition into an independent nonprofit.

The Dickenson County, VA chapter will soon become the Hearth of Appalachia Animal Rescue. This chapter began in 2014 to continue supporting the work of other shelters in the area. Thanks to the hard work of employees, volunteers, and other Dickenson community members, this chapter has saved over 700 lives in the last four years.

“We’re proud of all that these chapters have accomplished in their communities,” said Leah Craig Fieser, Executive Director of Brother Wolf Animal Rescue. “They have built a solid foundation over several years and for the past twelve months Brother Wolf has been helping them become their own nonprofit animal rescue organizations. We will continue to collaborate with them in the future as we do with several other rescue organizations in our region.”